Schedule: 2018-19 (Tentative)

ALL MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE SECOND WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE ATHENS COUNTY LIBRARY BRANCH AT 30 HOME ST. IN THE CITY OF ATHENS.   MEETINGS START AT 7:00 P.M. AND RUN FOR AN HOUR AND HALF.

Sept 12, 2018 (Wednesday) — Civil War battles far from the battlefield.  We know Confederates and Unionists fought on seemingly countless battlefronts and mobilized on homefronts. The two governments also opened up a crucial front of the war in Europe, according to Professor Brian Schoen, who will make this presentation.   On this foreign front they vied for guns, supplies, funds, and for the kind of publicity that might aid their respective side in the battle for Confederate recognition. The Civil War in Europe took place not only publicly in the press but also in secret where a number of men and women, including an interesting Confederate spy named Rebel Rose Greenlow, plotted with world leaders including Napoleon III. This talk will look at how that battle was fought and ultimately what proved key for the Union’s success.

Oct. 10, 2018 (Wednesday) – Grant and Sherman: The Ohio Friendship that Won the War. .

Noted Grant and Civil War historian Frank Scaturro makes a return trip to Athens to discuss the crucial role that the growing friendship of Ohio generals Grant and Sherman played in the prosecution of the war.  He will explore this friendship and its influences on the conduct and the ultimate success of the Union War efforts.

Grant and Sherman faced adversity in their prewar lives. When the war started, they answered the call to duty. But no one observing where they both were in 1861 would have predicted their meteoric rise to the top of the army.  Neither could anyone have predicted the tragic events that these two Ohio born and raised men would witness — the horror and the bloodshed that was of such a magnitude that it raised the question of the very survival of the Union itself. In this context, Scaturro will explore intertwining stories of Grant and Sherman from their early life to the war years and afterwards.

A word about Scaturro’s background: He is a Washington, D.C., attorney and author of one of the first scholarly books on Grant’s presidency to reassess the conventional notion that he was a failed president.  Instead in President Grant Reconsidered, he presents evidence and makes a strong case for Grant being the first civil rights president, who took decisive action to promote the civil rights of blacks and to fight for equal rights for all citizens.  Frank is also the author of a legal tome that documents the Supreme Court’s shameful retreat from the gains freedmen had made during Reconstruction.  

Nov. 14, 2018 (Wednesday) – Your Ancestor’s Regiment, or What Did Great-granddad Do in the War?  Since many members of our CWRT have ancestors who fought in the war, we thought it would be interesting for each member who has such a relative to talk briefly about what he or she knows about that ancestor. This would be followed by a roundtable discussion of the various theaters where these ancestors fought.

Jan. 9, 2019 (Wednesday) – Fighting for Our Freedom with “Unconditional Loyalty.”  Marvin Fletcher, professor emeritus of history at Ohio University, will make a presentation on the 26th United States Colored Infantry.  This regiment, like the 5th USCI, had a number of Ohio men in its ranks, including Athens physician Noah Elliott, as its hospital steward.  Another of its Ohio men, Benjamin Randolph, was assassinated by the KKK during Reconstruction, because he stayed in South Carolina fought for civil rights.  The regiment was involved in many significant actions, including: expedition to Johns and James Island, operations against Battery Pringle, the Battle of Honey Hill, demonstrations against Charleston and Savannah Railroad, and the Battle of Tulifinny Station.  

Feb. 13, 2019 (Wednesday) – Battles of Monocacy and Ft. Stevens.  This will be a two-part presentation.  First Carl J. Denbow will discuss the Battle of Monocacy, which was a Confederate victory but delayed the rebel advance on Washington enough to allow reinforcements to be put in place so that Confederates were repulsed at Ft. Stevens. Monocacy was an ironic battle in the while it was a defeat, it probably represented the best leadership of the war for General Lew Wallace.  The second part of the meeting will be a discussion of Ft. Stevens lead by David Frey.  Some have called this campaign by Jubal Early to threaten or take Washington as the last chance for victory by the Confederacy.  

March 13, 2019 (Wednesday) – Kansas-Nebraska Act: Prelude to War.  Michael Wood, associate professor of history at Marshall University, will discuss what some have called “the war before the war.” This act, and the violence it precipitated between pro- and anti-slavery factions, was one of a multitude of factors that propelled the nation to its inevitable conflict between North and South.  

April 10, 2019 (Wednesday) — Flamboyant GeneralsA true roundtable discussion of some of the most eccentric and flamboyant generals of the late rebellion.  Possible candidates include George Custer, Stonewall Jackson, Judson Kilpatrick, David Hunter, Thomas Francis Meagher, Nathan Forrest, Don Carlos Buell, Thomas Maley Harris, and John C. Frémont.

May 8, 2019 (Wednesday) – Through the good offices of Marvin Fletcher we will attempt to secure the services of Eric Wittenberg to make a presentation on Ohio cavalry units.